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for success in america and that has to do with how much money you make and i don't think that is a fair definition. so here a neurosurgeon who is not terribly nice to his wife and children, he makes a lot of money and he's a success but the taxi driver even though he is an enormously wonderful father, and husband he is not a success. so what do you mean by success? i think that definition may be a little different than ours. it certainly doesn't have everything to do with money. you see, and so i think it sounds to some people when you start the discussion somewhat crass. >> host: how did you conclude your flamboyant tree negotiation? >> guest: i didn't get it. [laughter] i didn't get it. i did learn though that they grow very fast and you can get them small and you don't even have to have -- my mother gardened decorative flowers until she was at least 93 and one i was a child -- to this is spending time in the yard because i loved it. i loved my hands in the soil just as she and we like to talk about plans in that sort of thing so that is one of the things i love about the caribbean be
for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year and a half ago in your view a lot of people can't get comfortable with the idea of an african-american president even though what a testament to the progress and the dream that dr. king had. and you even said during your speech yesterday there are forces, there are people who want to take us back. what specifically are you talking about? >> well, i hear people over and over again saying we want to take our country back. take it back where? where are we going? we need to go forward. we've made so much progress. i often think -- when i was growing up, i thought it was science that said white men, colored men, white women, colored women, colored waiting, those signs are gone. when i first came to washington in 1961, the same ye
the west which could threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. >> host: susan thank you for being with us. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking with you. >> host: let's start with the basics. what is the status of broadband in america today? >> guest: the picture at america's quite different from the other developed nations. we have god for very high. >> and download. >> in america cable monopolies and local monopolies in each region of the country dominate that market. and for 85% of americans the only choice with a live will be their local cable monopolies. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world's leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a deep digital divide so having an internet access at home is very tightly correlated to your socioeconomic status or maybe about half of the people with incomes between 30 and $50,000 a year have it at home and the number is lower for people with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington. i am kathy k. former egyptian leader hosni mubarak is free and out of resin only two years after being deposed. >> this is depressingly symbolic at a time when the security reborn, theto be man who resided over it has been released from prison. >> as pressure mounts to allow united nations inspectors into the site of yesterday's alleged chemical attack, we investigate the evidence in syria. she sings and she dances and she acts. tonight, she talks about a life that has seen its share of ups and downs. our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. hosni mubarak served two years of a life sentence in prison before he was released today. the former egyptian president was flown by helicopter out of jail. to the hospital he is held under house arrest. he still faces charges of complicity in the killing of tahrir square protesters. >> supporters celebrate the turning back of the clock. many celebrated his removal but two years of turmoil have made many egyptians nostalgic. >> hosni mubarak was the best. and weere the be
. but it is forecast growth of 2.5%, still better than america's with 2%. let me give you more context. some better context. take a look at thea chylosis in dollars. the next five biggest economies cannot compete with america's size. china is growing much faster but the u.s. economy is almost double china's size. america's economy will almost never grow that fast, because of more mature economy typically doesn't. today we have been asking you how do you measure your personal growth. i looic this one from mike. he says by how much i can borrow. >> this viewer seems to agree. an increase means little if i can't keep up with costs. tell me what you think by tweeter@aj real money or leave us a comment on facebook. what was the biggest driver of the growth in this country. it was exports. exports account for almost 14% of our nation'sgdp. and ships this emto places like brazil and bermuda. david joins us now from his home, good to see you, sir, thank you for being with us. tell us a little about what you were -- what your business was before you discovered exports? well, it is a pleasure to talk to you.
in america today? >> we have a picture that is quite different from the other developed nations. we have the high states of and download speeds in america cable monopolies, local monopolies and each region of the country that dominate that market and so for 85% of americans the only choice where they live is going to be at their local cable monopolists. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world leaders we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a very deep digital divide. so having internet access at home is tied to your economic status some may be about half of people with incomes between 30, $50,000 a year have internet connections at home but that number is even lower with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have internet access at home, and also 9% of americans can't buy internet access wherever they live because it is just not available and hasn't been billed out to their areas of that is the picture. >> host: how did we get here? it seems that the the internet started
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
the latest news online any time of day at www.aljazeera.com. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. inside of it. >> as the cries in syria plays out, rogue hackers have been busy with cyber attacks on the u.s. if you tried to go to "the new york times" website tuesday to get the latest on syria, you would have been directed to the syrian electric army instead manufacture it has been restored, but twitter accounts and even president obama's social media has been sit since the war in syria began. while it has been a nuisance, the threat o
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i am katty kay. as the world relate -- waits for a response to the theory and attack, forces are ready. >> we are ready to go. >> we are ready to go. order does come, what would military action look like? tonight, we assess the actions. a dream.id he had but 50 years after martin luther king delivered his famous speech, how much of it has come true? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. the u.s. is ready to launch a military strike against theory at a moments notice. that is what the defense secretary has told bbc news in an exclusive interview. the remarks came after suspected chemical attacks last week, and today, there was fresh fighting on the ground as the french point into the u.s. with some tough words on their own, saying they will punish those who decide to gas people. we start with our reporter who spoke to secretary chuck hagel. >> all dressed up and nowhere to go. were not able to carry out their work due to snipers, but due to which side, it is contest
threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. .. we don't have any of the fastest of the five cities in the world but comes to internet access in america, so we're not in the world leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack. we also have a very deep digital divide. having inaccessible kampf is very correlated tear socioeconomic palace. -- have a people have internet connections at home, but that number is even lower for people with incomes under 30,000 per year. rich people tend to have an and also 9 percent of americans cannot access the internet revenue because it has not been built up to their area. >> added we get here? it seems like the internet was started here. what is the divide? why has it not gone to people sums? >> quite a street. a great thing about the internet is that you can reach anybody. that is the whole point. a universal a disability program all idea was that the content provider, like google, would not be subject to the lens of a telecom provider, but we have this huge split between the ideals and openness of the internet is dependent
that the united states of america makes our own decisions on our own time lines based on our values and our interests. now, we know that after a decade of conflict the american people are tired of war. believe me, i am a too. but fatigue does not absolve us of our responsibility. just longing for peace does not necessarily bring it about. history would judge us all extroardinar illy harshly if we turn a blind eye to use of wepons of massa destruction against all common understanding of decen decenty. we know we have a president that will do what he said he will do. whatever decision he makes in syria it will bear no resemblance to iraq, iran or libya. it will not involve boots on the ground and will not be open ended and it will not assume responsibility for civil war that is already well under way. the president has been clear, any actiony he might decide to take will be limited and tailored response to ensure ay despot's brutal and flagrant use of chemical weapon system is held accountable and ultimately we are committed, we remain committed and believe it's the primary objective is to ha
the news to your money real. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> technology is coming on in the next few decades may make nuclear waste obsolete. we should all hope that's the case. but right now the international atomic energy agency expects the united states alone to produce at least 32,000 tons added to the pile. my next guess has made a documentary about the nuclear waste time will will air on al jazeera. if the problem can't be solved by new technology. it's directed by michael madsen who we will see in this clip explaining what it's all about. >> i am now in this place where you should never come
for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >> very much followed one of the two main camps. when they were aligned with the brotherhood and morsi, they kind of towed that line because they were against th. and like she said, they have no problem with a crackdown on the brotherhood by the military. and right now they really don't have leadership that is in the public sphere. they don't have someone who can speak on their behalf. they don't have someone who represents their opinions, and that makes it very difficult for them to really have a voice in decision-making. >> th
as highly discriminatory. what politicians decide to do about it but putting corporate america in a tough spot. an article in the new yorker this week titled "why the olympic sponsors should take action on gay rights." richard is a political strategist and gay rights advocate. bob zito is with us and he helped shape the brands of sony, new york stock exchange, bristol-myers squib. you write the participation of corporate sponsors mostly benefits the russian government. it's not required for american athletes to succeed. they sign deals before president putin signed that law. what do you think these corporate sponsors need to do now? >> i think the point is, right, that no one wants to penalize the athletes who worked so hard to succeed and most people believe we should participant. the corporate sponsors because they donate sod much money to the games, that they have earned the right to insist that russia comply with the policies that these corporations, most of these corporations have for their own employees of non-discrimination. i think that they have a lot of -- they have the power of
food but other service jobs overseas. >> the complaint is that we don'have jobs here in america. but the fact is labor is cheaper overseas. and youth unemployment here. minimum wage jobs in mcdonalds and entw level position are necessary for high school and college students to get a to the in the work force. if you start raising thatcost and making them more expensive, emplees willot hiring then. there is a 17 percent youth unemployment rate. we'll see go up. >> hold on, ju know. your city alone, there is a walmart law where they want to increase the wage for walmart. there is a 34 percent unemployment rate in teens in washington d.c. and you box them outine more from jobs th need. >> wait a second, if you are talking about mcdonald, the average worker is 28. not teenagers. and second eric y and wayne will have to get in corporate jets to go to mcdonald and send those jobs overseas. that's what wayne is saying. >> no, let's be honest here. one more thing eric, you want us to bring third world wages. >> what are you talking about. >>y corporate jet was built overseas. >> there w
." this is "bbc world news america ." reporting from washington, i'm jane o'brien. symbolic way felt president -- zimbabwe's president robert mugabe takes on rivals. james"whitey" bulger is found guilty. and we will meet the man who made it all the way to san francisco after getting a double long transplant. -- double lung transplant. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. in his first speech since the disputed july 31st election, zimbabwe's president robert mu gabe viciously attacked his opponents, saying they can "go and hang themselves." the chargey denied but at the vote was rigged. correspondent andrew harding has this report. victory?imous in not president mugabe's style. be's style.ident muga he had this to say. those who cannot handle defeat, can go hang themselves, said mr. mugabe. yet beenly he has not sworn in for another term. his opponents insist they have proof the election was stolen. -- theefeatedmdc nationd mdc spoke of a in mourning. willhave said they challenge the entire process in court. ehe court sides with mr. mugab in such matters.
to america's reality. millions still feel like they are missing out on the recovery. so when will it be their turn? christine romans has answers. "your money" starts now. >>> the american dream, happiness and prosperity. a house, a great job, maybe a couple of kids and time to enjoy it all. the great recession is behind us, but the recovery isn't so great. i'm christine romans and this is "your money." first, housing. goldman sachs says all cash deals are half the market right now. wealthy investors, buyers from china, canada, south america, pumping up recent housing data. average americans may be getting priced out. in the second quarter, when you look at this, more than two-thirds of all the homes sold in the u.s. were affordable. for families making $56,000 a year, that's the median u.s. income. but you can see how that affordability is falling. next, the labor market. nearly 5 million net new jobs have been created near the end of the recession four years ago, but look at the jobs that were lost. mostly middle wage jobs right here, and the jobs we're creating, mostly lowe
.s. aid, and an alliance that is one of america east most important in the middle east. and authorities have arrested mohammed badie. separately judicial officials say a court will review a petition to release, hosni mubarak. mubarak is waiting to be retried on charges of being behind the killi killings that take place. >>> and demonstrators waved flags and posters of ousted president, morsi. egypt's cabinet says more than 850 civilians have been killed in the last week. the muslim brotherhood puts the toll much higher. let's begin in washington with mike viqueira. mike what is the latest on the meeting with the president and his national security team? >> well that meeting broke up just a short time ago, tony. we don't yet have a readout. we know egypt was certainly tops on the agenda. what to do about u.s. aid that is still blowing after the chaos, killing and carnage. under mounting pressure to halt payments to egypt, today a flat denial from the white house that aid has already been cut off. >> this is not just a faucet in which you turn the spigot. whether tranches of aid have gone
welcome t to al jazeera america. president obama considers cutting aid egypt after weeks oh of bloodshed. billions is on the line. burning up, more than 50 wild fires out of control this wes in states and they are running out of resources. >> in bangladesh, how put americans are putting lives in danger. >> we begin in egypt. the violent and bloody change of government there. the u.s. is rethinking its relationship, powerful mideast allie. president obama met with his security advisors today about possibly cutting the billions of aid to egypt. the same time the white house is condemning accusations by turkey's prime minister that israel had a hand in the overthrow of president morsi. we are watching developments in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here s
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their to understand the industry you work in, to help provide capital for keep, strategic decisions. expertise in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i am katty kay. as the world relate -- waits for a response to the theory and attack, forces are ready. >> we are ready to go. >> we are ready to go. order does come, what would military action look like? tonight, we assess the actions. a dream.id he had but 50 years after martin luther king delivered his famous speech, how much of it has come true? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. the u.s. is ready to launch a military strike against theory at a moments
.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
with the national security council, america's top defense intelligence and cabinet officials meeting with the president in the west wing of the white house. a statement from the white house says they reviewed a range of potential options for the united states and the international community, and they note that the gathered group is mindful of the symptoms that are exhibited on many of those images that we have seen coming out in the wake of that chemical attack. chuck hagel, speaking of those options and the military options in particular has told reporters traveling with him in southeast asia that those option require positioning of our forces to be able to carry out whatever the president ultimately decides and we do know that a navy warship has stayed on longer, bringing a total of five into the eastern mediterranean. >> that's anom nus sign for the syrian regime. the red line has been crossed. the president, his rhetoric has toughened. he has talked about a co are fr being deployed by the assad regime. the goal, should the united states pursue a military option, not to enter on o
. >>> made in america, david muir takes us to meet the workers who just created the first smart phone made here at home. their new ideas and their promise that america is back. >> made in america! >>> good evening. today we all stopped to watch an incredible human drama in a cleveland courtroom. a tiny woman, a survivor, summoning the powering strength to stare down the man who had abused her for 11 years. when she finished in the bizarre turn, the kidnapper blamed his victims and insisted he was not a monster. he was somehow misunderstood. abc's alex perez takes us through the stunning showdown. >> reporter: she was his first victim, enduring 11 long years of abuse and torture. today michelle knight stood tall hugged those around her and faced down the man who held her captive. >> day turned into night, night turned into day. years turned into eternity. i knew nobody cared about me. he told me that my family didn't care. >> reporter: knight was 21 years old when castro lured her in with promises of a puppy for her son. amanda berry 16 when she was abducted. today she's 27. gina dejesus wa
and put a platform together that focuses on them. not everybody in america wants a business and money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work in community groups. spend time at their church. we, as republicans, believe that is a good thing. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an agenda of ideas to raise up folks who want to vote for us. you saw the last election. they did not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. the second thing is we need to talk less about the culture. he people who do this is those who do not want to talk about culture in the first place. as a result, do not engage as we have in this party. i will give you an exa
. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. can you say stocktopussy? g102 2 more news. ♪ >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their team. >> reporter: it's at the edge of locust grove high school football field just out of atlanta, where glen jones has the best view. his son was forrest jones, number 71 on the football team. drive. >> he was a hard worker. he just went aft
detroit, america is in big trouble. that's our show. see you next week.d show. tune in. charles: hello, everyone. i am charles payne, it is time to make some money. no more days at the beach and the stock market the toughest month of the year. i will tell you what to look out for in september. and the notion of so-called cheap stocks and the idea we play the market. the worst is the false idea of diversification. more than likely have fallen into that trap. we covered a lot this week and we will give you coverage of the week and months ahead, because it is all coming up on "making your market." stocks fell across the board today, this is not taking long heading into this holiday weekend. especially not with the uncertainty in syria. one of the worst months for stock since last may. utilities and financials led the market ler. the dow lost four and .5%, the s&p 500 lost ov 3%. still the market up easily double digits so far this year so let's get to our panel. i will never mess that up again. and this one, our friend. guys, let's talk a little bit about this month, the worst mont
calculations and the reason has to do with not only international norms but also america's core self interest. >> in texas, the fort hood shooter gets the death sentence. nidal hasan, the death sentence now starts an automatic appeals process. on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech, hundreds of thousands gathered at the national mall. >>> fire continues to go into yosemite national park. that's the news at this hour. we'll see you at 11. >> on america tonight, stepping back, faced with the unraveling of national support for the strike on syria will the u.s. president go it alone? >>> and on the anniversary of the march for jobs and justice we consider just how much difference 50 years have made. >> dr. king would ask, to sit at the integrated lunch count if you can't -- counterif you can't afford the meal. >>> the new fight against another vicious intruder. >> this one is a 10.5% alcohol in there. this is what they drink. and good evening, thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. >>> at the end of a tumultuous day, president obama says if he decides to launc
, but also america's core self interests. >> the army major convicted of killing 13 people at fort hood in texas has been sentenced to die. nadal hassan was sentenced earlier today. that sentence will be automatically appealed. >> on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech, thousands gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement
of the south asian political dynamic in america. that was my first event at the forum. and those it is right feel most at home here in new york in drew is modest because these books and we have done together starting over one decade ago when we will talk about why the meeting of the world social forum it was a world conference against racism and intolerance and discrimination so why was there such chaos come on the stage of the left? there never seems to be a coherent agenda. we have so many different issues in there and able to fight a united horizon. not a single horizon but some kind of unity but the first time we talk about this i said i would write a book about it be over 100 pages because of durbin was in danger of being forgotten. faugh five all that work that went to put together this major conference was in danger of the loss. i remember we matt and i said i cannot publish his book because it is a book of defeat it does not recognize there is no future for the movement. it is a swan song that never came together. said then went back where is the dynamic? what about in the venues lik
it could affect manufacturing. we kick off a special series called made in america. >> it was a stunning late day capper today to a day of major news affecting the newspapers you read, the websites you visit, the tv networks you watch, and the cable systems you may subscribe to. amazon.com founder and ceo is buying the publishing business of the washington post company. which includes the fames newspaper for $250 million. the post long run by members of the eugene meyer and graham families reached the peak of its fame for tough reporting, during the watergate era. baso says, i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c., and our nation, and the post's values will not change. according to an sec filing, the rest of the company will change its name within 60 days of the deal's closing and investors like the news. they sent shares of washington post higher after hours. >>> another media legend. newsweek, once owned by the washington post company was sold again. this time to ibt media. this is the all digital news publisher of the international business times. the price a
. -- andrybody in america money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work and community groups. spend time at their church. we as republicans believe that is a good inc.. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. -- that is a good thing. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an upnda of ideas to raise folks who want to vote for us. you side and the last election. they do not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. --st and foremost, we need first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build to becoming, everybody will be fine. -- if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. [applause] the second inc. as we be to talk less about the culture area -- thing is we need to talk less about the culture. the people who do this is who do not want to talk about culture in the firs
america." >> this is "bbc world news america." thatay after the clashes killed more than 600 people in egypt, president obama condemned the violence but cut short of cutting off aid. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> a car bomb rips through a suburb of beirut, killing 18 people and a stronghold of hezbollah. revealed species was to the world today. actually it has been hiding in plain sight. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. egypt's capital city has been the scene of morning, anger, and unrest after the clashes between security forces and supporters that -- of mohamed morsi. more than 600 people have died and their opponents say the number is higher. tonight the un security council is getting an emergency briefing. jeremy bowen reports from cairo on the days events. the setsrought ice up of the mops because in cairo, dead bodies decompose sought -- quickly. inside there were 200 in trouts, surrounded by their families. they blame the army commander. this is my brother,
tanks after hundreds of tons of water leaked out. >>> al jazeera america has kicked off in new york. some welcome a different angle on the news while others say it's biased against the u.s. >>> and the friends and family of a japanese war correspondent are remembering her one year after her death and trying to spread her message. >>> workers at the damaged fukushima daiichi plant say a leakage of contaminated water may have gone undetected for some time. they say the storage tank doesn't have a water level gauge and their monitoring may not have been adequate. workers found a puddle forming just outside a low wall surrounding tanks near reactor number four. they confirmed one of the tanks lost more than 300 tons of water. the water contains high levels of radioactive substances. officials of the tokyo electric power company says the tank has no water gauge. they say the workers didn't notice the leak in their daily inspections until they saw the puddle outside the barrier. nuclear regulators urged the utility to check 350 tanks of the same structure in the compound. >> translator: i
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